Is Acetaminophen completely safe?

Is very probable that most of us, at least once, have taken Acetaminophen, commonly known as Tylenol, to treat headaches, minor pains, fever or for the common cold. However, have you ever thought about the risks of taking Acetaminophen?

Acetaminophen is considered a safe drug and that’s why we can even get it from vending machines at a public restroom. But, it’s important to be aware of which are the risks of abusing Acetaminophen before ending up at the ER. For example, let’s say you have the common flu, which means you have minor muscle pains, low fever, headache, runny nose and cough. You head out to you local pharmacy and buy Tylenol Extra Strength for the pain and Theraflu Daytime for the common cold symptoms. Both drugs recommend taking a dose every 6 hours (four times a day). What most people aren’t aware is that both of these medications contain Acetaminophen, which means your putting into your body 4.6 grams of the drug (2g from the Tylenol and 2.6g from the Theraflu), 600 milligrams above the daily dose recommended to avoid liver failure.

An over dosage of Acetaminophen (more than 4 grams daily) increases significantly the risk of liver failure. Acetaminophen, as all other drugs, is metabolized by the liver and then excreted through the urine. The excess Acetaminophen can’t be metabolized by the liver, which turns the excess into a toxin that can produce acute liver failure.

That’s why we must always consult a doctor before self-medicating an over-the-counter drug and always pay attention to the labels.

Off-label indications or uses for Propranolol

An off-label indication or off-label drug use is when a doctor prescribes a medication for a treatment that still hasn’t been officially approved by the FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration). This means that a drug is being prescribed for a different use than the ones labeled to the FDA by the drug manufacturer.

In this blog post we’re going to write about the off-label uses for Propranolol, this drug belongs to a group of drugs called beta-blocking agents and works by relaxing blood vessels to reduce blood pressure. Propranolol is used for the treatment of high blood pressure, chest pain (angina) and uneven heartbeat, also can be used to prevent migraine attacks.

Off-label indications or uses for Propranolol

Esophageal Variceal Bleeding: Esophageal Variceal Bleeding can be preventing with the use of beta blocking agents such as Propranolol because this drug can reduce the portal pressure and decrease the risk of bleeding from esophageal varices.

Panic disorder: Some physicians consider that beta blockers such as Propranolol can helps to reduce panic/anxiety attacks in patients with agoraphobia. But some studies reveals that Propranolol or other beta blockers has not enough impact in the treatment of those illness

Aggressive Behavior: Propranolol is used to manage aggression in some neuropsychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and dementia.

With MatchMyRx patients and providers can match medications with medical conditions to identify off-label indications or drug uses.

 

Off-label indications or uses for Fluoxetine

An off-label indication or off-label drug use is when a doctor prescribes a medication for a treatment that still hasn’t been officially approved by the FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration). This means that a drug is being prescribed for a different use than the ones labeled to the FDA by the drug manufacturer.

In this blog post we’re going to write about the off-label uses for Fluoxetine, commonly known as Prozac, a drug that works affecting the communication between nerve cells in the Central Nervous System (CNS) and restoring the chemical balance in the brain. Fluoxetine is used for the treatment of some types of disorders, such as: depressive disorder, bulimia, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and panic disorder.

Off-label indications or uses for Fluoxetine

Fibromyalgia: Fibromyalgia is a chronic musculoskeletal disorder characterized by widespread pain and tenderness and Fluoxetine helps decreasing the severity of pain.

Migraine: Fluoxetine can helps to reduce the severity of pain in patients with migraine who takes Fluoxetine for at least 3 months

Hot Flashes caused by hormonal chemotherapy: Fluoxetine helps to alleviate menopause symptoms such as hot flashes in a short term use

Raynaud’s phenomenon: Some studies shows that Fluoxetine reduces the attack frequency in patients with Raynaud’s phenomenon.

With MatchMyRx patients and providers can match medications with medical conditions to identify off-label indications or drug uses.

 

FDA approves Xyrem (sodium oxybate) generic with a REMS Program

The FDA has approved the first generic version of Xyrem (sodium oxybate) Oral Solution, to treat cataplexy, a primary symptom of narcolepsy where patients suddenly lose muscle tone, including voluntary muscle control, while awake. and excessive daytime sleepiness in patients with narcolepsy. Approximately 70 percent of people with narcolepsy have cataplexy. Sodium oxybate is the only medication approved to treat cataplexy in patients with narcolepsy.

The use of Xyrem has been associated with serious side effects including seizures, trouble breathing, changes in alertness, coma, and death. Additionally, the active ingredient in Xyrem (and in the newly approved generic) is sodium oxybate. Sodium oxybate is the sodium salt of gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB). GHB has not been approved for any medical use and has the potential for abuse, such as in cases of sexual assault.

Because of the potential risks associated with Xyrem, it is subject to strict safety controls on prescribing and dispensing under a program called a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS). FDA’s approval of generic sodium oxybate is subject to a REMS with strict safety controls that are comparable to those currently required for Xyrem.

Specifically, under both the Xyrem REMS and the generic sodium oxybate REMS, sodium oxybate can be prescribed only by a certified prescriber, and dispensed only to an enrolled patient by a certified pharmacy. Only a certified pharmacy that ships directly to patients can dispense sodium oxybate. Sodium oxybate will not be available in retail pharmacies.

In approving this generic version of Xyrem, the FDA is maintaining strict safety requirements for sodium oxybate, while providing patients with access to a generic medication option for narcolepsy.

For more information about the FDA’s press release click here.

To learn if Xyrem goes with your health conditions, match your meds with your conditions.

Vitamin D Deficiency: A new epidemic in the United States?

We all know, and think, that vitamin D is the “sunshine vitamin” or the “bone health vitamin” and that’s true. We can absorb Vitamin D through sunlight, and some types of food, which may help improve our bone’s health. But there’s more than meets the eye. There are a lot of interesting facts about Vitamin D that people aren’t aware off. For example: When our liver and kidneys metabolize Vitamin D, it turns into a kind of steroid that can manage thousands of genes in our body, which manage several functions as the immune system, respiratory system, muscle functions, cardiovascular functions and brain development; it can also reduce the risk of developing cancer, autoimmune diseases, infections, diabetes and bone and joint aches.

Last year, PRX Control Solutions, a company that detects abuse and waste in prescription claims in real-time at the point of care or pharmacy, published a case study that showed that 733 patients out of 6609 (11,09%) were diagnosed with Vitamin D deficiency. Those patients had other illnesses such as: muscle and joint pain, primary hypertension, diabetes, cancer, obesity and anxiety or depressive disorders.

As we previously explained, Vitamin D has a very important role in many of our body functions, including brain development; and according to a study published by Molecular Psychiatry there’s a lot of evidence that links gestational Vitamin D deficiency with Autism-spectral disorder and other neurodevelopment disorders such as schizophrenia.

Several studies reveal that over 40% of the U.S population has Vitamin D deficiency. Those studies show that the better sources of Vitamin D are sunlight and some types of foods. Supplements may not be the best source of Vitamin D since they supply Vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol), which needs more time and several chemical mechanisms in our body to convert it into the active form of Vitamin D; therefore is less effective than Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol), which is the type of Vitamin D we obtain through sunlight and a proper diet.

In conclusion, if you have or you know somebody with Vitamin D deficiency, do not hesitate to ask to your doctor or healthcare provider about Vitamin D3 supplements and a proper diet.

To learn if you were prescribed a medication for Vitamin D deficiency, match your meds with your conditions.

What is Amlodipine and what is it prescribed for?

Amlodipine, sold under the brand name Norvasc among others, is used to treat high blood pressure, which helps prevent strokes, heart attacks, and kidney problems and also it is used to treat coronary artery disease, such as chest pain (angina). It works by relaxing blood vessels so blood can flow more easily, this medication belongs to a class known as calcium channel blockers.

What is Amlodipine prescribed for?

*No Match: No match means that Amlodipine was prescribed but the patient didn’t have a medical condition that matched with the drug on their medical records. In other words, the patient has an uncoded condition on their record.

Most common Amlodipine Dosages?

1 AMLODIPINE BESYLATE TAB. 5 MG
2 AMLODIPINE BESYLATE TAB. 10 MG
3 AMLODIPINE BESYLATE TAB. 2.5 MG
4 NORVASC TAB. 5 MG

Other common Amlodipine Combinations?

1 AMLODIPINE+BENAZEPRIL HCL CAPS 10/40 MG
2 AMLODIPINE+BENAZEPRIL HCL CAPS 10/20 MG
3 AMLODIPINE+BENAZEPRIL HCL CAPS 5/20 MG
4 AMLODIPINE+BENAZEPRIL HCL CAPS 5/40 MG
5 AMLODIPINE+BENAZEPRIL HCL CAPS 5/10 MG
6 AMLODIPINE, VALSARTAN+HCT TAB 10 MG/1
7 AMLODIPINE+BENAZEPRIL HCL CAPS 2.5/10 MG
8 AMLODIPINE, VALSARTAN+HCT TAB 5 MG/1
9 TELMISARTAN+AMLODIPINE TAB. 5/40 MG
10 AMLODIPINE+BENAZEPRIL HCL CAPS 2.5/10 MG
11 AMLODIPINE, VALSARTAN+HCT TAB 5 MG/1
12 AMLODIPINE+ATORVASTATIN TAB. 10/40 MG

The following information is provided by our parent company PRX Control Solutions.

If you are pregnant you should ask your doctor because this drug is classified as Category C, according to FDA Pregnancy Categories, it means that it may be acceptable but animal reproduction studies have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. If you are breast-feeding, using Amlodipine is not recommended because it is unknown whether drug is excreted in milk, you might talk to your doctor and ask him for an alternative medication.

Watch out if you are taking Amlodipine and you are going to start taking dantrolene, a muscle relaxant, because they may interact increasing toxicity of both drugs.

Can I drink alcohol with amlodipine?

You can, but not more than 2 glasses per day, drinking alcohol can further lower your blood pressure and may increase certain side effects of amlodipine.

Please consult your healthcare provider for more information about Amlodipine.

To learn if Amlodipine was prescribed for any of your health conditions, create your Free Medication Record.

10 most prescribed drugs for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus?

What is Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus?

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic medical condition produced by a metabolism disorder characterized by insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone that helps the pancreas process sugars and regulate sugar levels on the blood.

What Causes Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

  • Hereditary
  • Lack of exercise
  • Obesity
  • Bad diet: high fat, sugars and no fiber

Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

  • Fatigue
  • Increased thirst
  • Frequent urination
  • Weight loss or weight gain
  • Blurred vision

10 most prescribed drugs for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus?

1 METFORMIN HCL
2 JANUMET
3 GLIMEPIRIDE
4 GLIPIZIDE
5 GLYBURIDE+METFORMIN HCL
6 JANUVIA
7 GABAPENTIN
8 GLYBURIDE
9 PIOGLITAZONE HCL
10 GLIPIZIDE XL

The following information is provided by our parent company PRX Control Solutions.

Please consult your healthcare provider to learn which treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus works best for your condition.

To learn if you were prescribed a drug for type 2 diabetes, create your free medication record.

To learn more: Type 2 Diabetes Infographic

What is Atorvastatin and what’s prescribed for?

Atorvastatin is a drug used to treat high cholesterol levels, and to lower the risk of stroke, heart attack or other heart complications in people with coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes or other risk factors. It is marketed under the trade name Lipitor among others.

This drug is in a group called HMG CoA reductase inhibitors or “statins”, which means that it reduces levels of “bad cholesterol” (LDL) and triglycerides in the blood, while increasing levels of “good” cholesterol (HDL). Lipid metabolism occurs at night, which is the reason why your doctor recommends you to take statins before you go to sleep.

What is Atorvastatin prescribed for?

*No Match: No match means that Atorvastatin was prescribed but the patient didn’t have a medical condition that matched with the drug on their medical records. In other words, the patient has an uncoded condition on their record.

Most common Atorvastatin Dosages?

The following information is provided by our parent company PRX Control Solutions.

If you are pregnant, or breast-feeding, or if you have liver disease you should not take atorvastatin, because it is not secure, in that case, please contact to your doctor, and if you become pregnant, stop taking this medication and called your doctor right away.

You should take into account that Atorvastatin may interact with some drugs, if you are taking any of the following medications, please do not start taking atorvastatin and ask your doctor: Cyclosporine, Gemfibrozil, Pazopanib, Red Yeast Rice, Telaprevir and Tipranavir.

Atorvastatin, also may interact with grapefruit juice, you should limit your consumption of it to no more than 1 quart per day during treatment with atorvastatin because it can increase blood levels of atorvastatin and will increase the risk of side effects, such as liver damage and a rare but serious condition called rhabdomyolysis, which is the breakdown of skeletal muscle tissue.

Can I drink alcohol with atorvastatin ?

Yes, you can, but not exceeded more than two glasses per day because alcohol may increase the risk of several side effects that could damage your liver.

Please consult your healthcare provider for more information about Atorvastatin.

To learn if you have an uncoded condition on your records, match your meds with your conditions.

What are off-label indications or drug uses?

An off-label indication or off-label drug use is when a doctor prescribes a medication for a treatment that still hasn’t been officially approved by the FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration). This means that a drug is being prescribed for a different use than the ones labeled to the FDA by the drug manufacturer.

 Are off-label indications or drug uses legal?

Yes, so don’t panic. In fact, it’s a very common practice by doctors. What’s illegal is for pharmaceutical companies to promote the off-label uses to doctors and patients without any evidence of completed and successful trials.

With MatchMyRx patients and providers can match medications with medical conditions to identify off-label indications or drug uses. Providers and Health Systems can also detect off-label indications in real-time during the prescription process, by integrating MatchMyRx as a free add-on within their EHR.

Antibiotics for the Common Cold: are they really necessary?

Winter’s here! That means that the cold season is just beginning. Get ready for antibiotics!

But are antibiotics really necessary for a common cold?

Antibiotics are prescription medications used to treat and prevent bacterial infections.

Colds are caused by viruses not bacteria, and there is no antibiotic that can fight one. When you take antibiotics when you don’t need to, it becomes less effective, because when bacteria in our body comes into contact with antibiotics, they can rapidly evolve or mutate to survive, and these new strains are “resistant” to some types of antibiotics, which means that if you suffer a bacterial infection in the future it may be difficult for your doctor to find a drug efficient enough to fight it. According to a CDC study, antibiotic use is the leading cause of antibiotic resistance. Up to one-third to one-half of antibiotic use in humans is either unnecessary or inappropriate.

That said, there is a way to protect yourself and others from resistant bacteria, and that is respecting antibiotics and taking them only when necessary, paying attention to your doctor and correctly fulfilling the therapy.

So, what should I do if I have a cold?

Colds usually heals on their own in about 4 to 7 days. You can take over-the-counter drugs (OTC) that can make you feel better and help you fight the virus, for example: an anti-allergic for your runny nose and expectorants for your cough. The key treatment for cold is lots of rest and drinking lots of fluids, which make mucus flow more freely and helps with congestion.

If your cold doesn’t go away in a few days and if you have a fever or other more severe symptoms, you should contact your doctor. Do not ask for antibiotics! Your doctor will prescribe you the best therapy, and remember, you only need to take antibiotics if you know that the infection you have is a bacterial one.

By using MatchMmyRx and matching your Meds with your Conditions you will be able to know which meds of your therapy are antibiotics and if you have a bacterial health condition.

Match your Meds with your Conditions and learn more about your prescriptions